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Welcome to the Mount Diablo Interpretive Association Website

Mount Diablo Interpretive Association (MDIA) is a non-profit all-volunteer organization that assists the California Department of Parks and Recreation in maintaining and interpreting Mount Diablo State Park for its 700,000 visitors each year. Through education, sponsored activities and publications, MDIA fosters appreciation and the enlightened use of Mount Diablo State Park. MDIA is proud to provide the resources necessary to keep the Summit Museum and Mitchell Canyon Visitor Center open throughout the year. In addition, one of MDIA’s key roles is coordinating the “Volunteers in Parks,” program, which trains and manages park docents, sponsors guided hikes, and helps maintain trails.

Hiker’s Guide to Mount Diablo State Park is now available!hikers guide cover mdia-1

MDIA is pleased to announce that the much-anticipated Hiker’s Guide to Mount Diablo State Park has just arrived! This beautiful full-color book features comprehensive descriptions and stunning photographs, along with helpful maps and profiles for 50 hikes in the park including several new hike ideas. The Hiker’s Guide to Mount Diablo State Park strives to offer hikes that will be of interest to all park visitors, with distances ranging from less than half a mile, to a full marathon that circumnavigates the mountain.

Click here to order directly from MDIA’s online store, or purchase at the Mitchell Canyon Visitor Center or Summit Visitor Center.

A special note to holiday shoppers: The Hiker’s Guide makes an excellent gift for hikers and for anyone who enjoys the magnificent scenery of Mount Diablo!

harvest of fire
Mount Diablo’s “Harvest of Fire” by Joan Hamilton Featured in Bay Nature Magazine

It’s been just over two years since the Morgan Fire engulfed Mount Diablo. As soon as the embers had cooled, freelance environmental writer Joan Hamilton began chronicling its recovery for Bay Nature magazine. “Harvest of Fire,” Bay Nature’s October–December 2015 cover story, is the culmination of Hamilton’s impressive work over the past two years.

Read Joan’s fascinating story of recovery on the mountain in Bay Nature and view her complete Morgan Fire coverage at Harvest of Fire, with photos, slide shows, and maps. Bay Nature magazine is a beautiful and informative quarterly local magazine that helps you explore and understand the natural wonders outside your door. To purchase this issue, back issues, or subscribe in general, go to Subscribe today!

You may be familiar with Joan’s work elsewhere on the MDIA website. Check out the audio tours of Mount Diablo link at the bottom of this web page and a related article, the Perkins Canyon audio tour, which was in process when the Morgan Fire started.

Water Shortage in Mount Diablo State Park

updated 7/18/2015

California is in the midst of its 4th straight year of drought. The entire state is in some stage of drought with more than 77% of the state experiencing “extreme” to “exceptional” drought conditions. The majority of the water used by park visitors at Mount Diablo State Park is produced through a series of springs that is fed to various water tanks. Once at the water tank, the water is treated and tested before being ready for public use. However, with the lack of rain the past three years, the springs on the mountain have been reduced to a trickle and water tanks are close to empty. 

In order to meet the park’s basic water needs until the rainy season, the park has been forced to take a number of drastic measures in order to conserve water:
· All showers in the park have been turned off.
· The water spigots have been shut off in Live Oak Campground and Juniper Campground. Potable water is still available at the faucets at the restrooms in the campgrounds. Signs on the  spigots direct campers to those restrooms.


If you are planning a long hike, run, walk, bicycle ride or horseback ride, please bring plenty of water to ensure a safe and enjoyable visit. It is not unusual for heat-related illnesses (heat cramps, heat exhaustion and heat stroke) to occur at Mount Diablo State Park during the late spring, summer and early fall seasons. Although many of these illnesses can be treated without hospitalization, some heat related illnesses have proven fatal to park visitors in the past.
By taking the necessary precautions, the vast majority of visitors enjoy a safe and memorable visit to Mount Diablo in all seasons.

Mary Bowerman Trail Is Open

09/26/15mary- bowerman

The northern paved portion of the Mary Bowerman Trail is open again for visitor use. The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) upgrades have been completed, and the north
side of Summit Road near the beginning of the trail is now an ADA parking area. Come see the finished work.

Rock City Audio Tour Is Now Available

Listen to our newest audio tour, a 1.6-mile walk exploring the history, geology, and plants of Rock City, one of the most popular places in Mount Diablo State Park. Also included is an audio portion describing the close relationship between the community of Diablo, the park and some of Californias most important historical figures. To listen, please click on this link or the link at the bottom of this page.
This tour has been made available through sponsorship by MDIA and the Diablo Country Club.

Volunteer Opportunities

MDIA encourages the public to join our organization and become involved in its mission to support the park. We are always looking for dedicated volunteers to lead or help with various programs, outreach and operations. Volunteers can commit to as little as a couple of hours a week or volunteer on a project-specific, ad hoc basis and still provide vital assistance.(read more).
Citizen Scientists: Help Monitor Fire Recovery!
Check out the four camera stations along the Mary Bowerman (Fire Interpretive) Trail and other locations in the Morgan Fire burn area. Please take photos with your smart phone and upload them to social media. Our partner group Nerds for Nature will use the photos to create a time-lapse video of the landscape recovering and changing over the next several years. Please participate when you see the stations and be a part of studying the fire recovery. Contact Cyndy Shafer at
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. .